Archive | March, 2012

Healthy Nibbles: ListMania Edition

26 Mar

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 19th, 2012.

Whether it be ‘how to’ tips or ‘best and worst’ rankings, people just can’t seem to get enough of lists. So, in keeping with this spirit, here’s a collection of health- and nutrition-related lists that made news headlines this past week. Enjoy!

Healthy Living Lists

Pic Courtesy of J. Mulik

Just how much control does your mood have over your appetite? If you’re anything like me and answered “too much,” here’s a breakdown of handy tips to help overcome emotional eating. [Healthland TIME]

When it comes to exercising, getting started is often the biggest hurdle for many people. For those who’ve successfully made it over this initial hump, the next challenge will likely be maintaining momentum. For that extra push, here are a few fitness tips to help overcome that dreaded performance plateau. [Health Zone]

Childhood obesity is a growing concern for parents and public health officials alike. To help address the issue, here are a few parenting tips to help little ones lose unwanted pounds. [The Atlantic]

Though the items might change from time to time, this list seems to be on permanent rotation in any health forum. It’s an oldie but a goodie – a breakdown of the best foods to help boost your diet and fight fat. [Vancouver Sun]

Okay, as far as lists go, this one is pretty short. But what this food-related recommended reading list lacks in size, it makes up for in substance. Who wouldn’t want to get their hands on a bit more perspective, right? [The Atlantic]

Healthy Nibbles: 12 March 2012 Edition

19 Mar

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 12th, 2012:

Pic Courtesy of J.Mulik

Can’t get over the taste(lessness) of healthy foods? If you think ‘unprocessed’ is synonymous with ‘unpalatable’, perhaps your taste buds need reprogramming. [The Atlantic]

Managing the plethora of nutrition information currently available can be a challenge for anyone. To help navigate between fact and fiction, here are a few popular nutrition myths, debunked. [Vancouver Sun]

The Guiding Stars® nutrition rating system isn’t the only method around aiming to simplify dietary information. Joint research out of Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital suggests that both visual (colour) and spatial (eye level) cues can go a long way towards helping consumers make health-conscious choices. [The Atlantic]

As if the decision to have a baby isn’t weighty enough, moms-to-be may want to consider adding ‘overcoming obesity’ to their pre-pregnancy To Do lists. [Healthland TIME]

Who says people these days don’t read signs? With just the right kind of wording, signs can have a huge impact on behavior. Just ask the growing number of New Yorkers who have not only read the ‘Burn Calories, Not Electricity’ signs, but have opted to take the stairs instead of the elevator, as a result. [The Atlantic]

In spite of their recent rise in popularity, active video game consoles, such as Wii-Fit™, may not be doing much to enhance the actual fitness of children. [National Post]

Instead of eating less, how about just not eating more? According to researchers from Duke University, although this strategy won’t do much to solve the current obesity problem, over time, it may keep the epidemic from growing any bigger (no pun intended). And as far as nutrition advice is concerned, for many people, this kind of approach is much easier to digest than calorie restriction. [Healthland TIME]

Healthy Nibbles: 05 March 2012 Edition

12 Mar

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 5th, 2012:

Pic courtesy of J. Mulik

Following a recent regualtory mandate that warning labels be put on foods containing certain levels of cancer-promoting ingredients, Coca-Cola® and Pepsi® have announced impending changes to the recipe for their iconic caramel colouring. How about just getting rid of the caramel colour all together, because let’s face it, who drinks Coke for its colour? [Healthland TIME]

Contrary to popular belief, Disney may NOT actually be the “happiest place on earth” for all children. Not if you’re an overweight child, anyways. [Vancouver Sun]

When it comes to food labeling, do you know what natural means? Because food experts and regulatory officials don’t always agree. [The Atlantic]

Recent research suggests that both fatness and fitness matter when it comes to promoting a healthy heart. [NY Times]

According to researchers at the University of Laval, healthy isn’t necessarily synonymous with skinny. In fact, they believe that people of every size have the potential to be healthy – provided they focus more on behaviours rather than on scale numbers.  [Vancouver Sun]

Wondering why you just can’t keep from over indulging? Here are some of the most common reasons people tend to overeat, and what you can do to try and minimize that second (… or third) helping. [The Atlantic]

If you’re still on the hunt for a magic weight loss pill, stop. According to a recent study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, it just doesn’t exist. [Science Daily]

How would you describe the feeling of fat on your tongue? Your answer may be related to your personal preference for fatty foods, and ultimately, your likelihood of obesity. [Science Daily]

Moving from field to plate is no easy task. To better appreciate what you put into your mouth, here’s a journalist’s account of what it’s like on the frontline picking peaches. [The Atlantic]