Tag Archives: Health Advocacy

Healthy Nibbles: 26 March 2012 Edition

2 Apr

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 26th, 2012.

Pic courtesty of J. Mulik

Who says eating healthy is too expensive? At a mere $0.25 per casserole, the Florida non-profit group “Feeding Children Everywhere” is making it unbelievably affordable. Talk about getting some serious bang for your buck. [Vancouver Sun]

Even the success of shedding weight may not be enough to overcome the stigma of having been overweight or obese. In young children, maintaining a healthy self-esteem post-weight loss may be just as big a challenge as losing the weight in the first place. [Healthland TIME]

Since when did ‘convenient’ become a dirty word? Since it started compromising the long-term health of children, says Mark Tremblay, the guidelines committee chairperson for the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. According to Tremblay, daily exercise should never take a back seat to more sedentary activities, regardless of however more convenient for busy parents. Ever. [Vancouver Sun]

According to a recent study published in the Public Health Nutrition journal, the risk of developing depression appears greater for frequent fast food patrons compared to those who eat fast food only occasionally. Seems like the McDonalds “Happy Meal” may in fact be somewhat of a misnomer. [Science Daily]

Finding it hard to tune out the voices of cakes and cookies calling your name? Here are a few tips to help you curb those cravings for sweets. [Vancouver Sun]

Even at the best of times, healthy eating can be a challenge for many. While on vacation, it can be nearly impossible. Here are a few tips to help you keep up your healthy eating regimen while you’re winding down. [Vancouver Sun]

Healthy Nibbles: 12 March 2012 Edition

19 Mar

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 12th, 2012:

Pic Courtesy of J.Mulik

Can’t get over the taste(lessness) of healthy foods? If you think ‘unprocessed’ is synonymous with ‘unpalatable’, perhaps your taste buds need reprogramming. [The Atlantic]

Managing the plethora of nutrition information currently available can be a challenge for anyone. To help navigate between fact and fiction, here are a few popular nutrition myths, debunked. [Vancouver Sun]

The Guiding Stars® nutrition rating system isn’t the only method around aiming to simplify dietary information. Joint research out of Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital suggests that both visual (colour) and spatial (eye level) cues can go a long way towards helping consumers make health-conscious choices. [The Atlantic]

As if the decision to have a baby isn’t weighty enough, moms-to-be may want to consider adding ‘overcoming obesity’ to their pre-pregnancy To Do lists. [Healthland TIME]

Who says people these days don’t read signs? With just the right kind of wording, signs can have a huge impact on behavior. Just ask the growing number of New Yorkers who have not only read the ‘Burn Calories, Not Electricity’ signs, but have opted to take the stairs instead of the elevator, as a result. [The Atlantic]

In spite of their recent rise in popularity, active video game consoles, such as Wii-Fit™, may not be doing much to enhance the actual fitness of children. [National Post]

Instead of eating less, how about just not eating more? According to researchers from Duke University, although this strategy won’t do much to solve the current obesity problem, over time, it may keep the epidemic from growing any bigger (no pun intended). And as far as nutrition advice is concerned, for many people, this kind of approach is much easier to digest than calorie restriction. [Healthland TIME]

Healthy Nibbles: 05 March 2012 Edition

12 Mar

From our eyes to yours … here’s what was up in health and nutrition news for the week of March 5th, 2012:

Pic courtesy of J. Mulik

Following a recent regualtory mandate that warning labels be put on foods containing certain levels of cancer-promoting ingredients, Coca-Cola® and Pepsi® have announced impending changes to the recipe for their iconic caramel colouring. How about just getting rid of the caramel colour all together, because let’s face it, who drinks Coke for its colour? [Healthland TIME]

Contrary to popular belief, Disney may NOT actually be the “happiest place on earth” for all children. Not if you’re an overweight child, anyways. [Vancouver Sun]

When it comes to food labeling, do you know what natural means? Because food experts and regulatory officials don’t always agree. [The Atlantic]

Recent research suggests that both fatness and fitness matter when it comes to promoting a healthy heart. [NY Times]

According to researchers at the University of Laval, healthy isn’t necessarily synonymous with skinny. In fact, they believe that people of every size have the potential to be healthy – provided they focus more on behaviours rather than on scale numbers.  [Vancouver Sun]

Wondering why you just can’t keep from over indulging? Here are some of the most common reasons people tend to overeat, and what you can do to try and minimize that second (… or third) helping. [The Atlantic]

If you’re still on the hunt for a magic weight loss pill, stop. According to a recent study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, it just doesn’t exist. [Science Daily]

How would you describe the feeling of fat on your tongue? Your answer may be related to your personal preference for fatty foods, and ultimately, your likelihood of obesity. [Science Daily]

Moving from field to plate is no easy task. To better appreciate what you put into your mouth, here’s a journalist’s account of what it’s like on the frontline picking peaches. [The Atlantic]

Healthy Nibbles: 20 February 2012 Edition

27 Feb

From our eyes to yours … here’s what’s up in health and nutrition news for the week of February 20th, 2012:

Even the smallest choices can eventually add up to big differences on the scale. It therefore helps to be mindful of how to make the right choices, everyday, to ensure the scale is tipping in the right direction. [Globe & Mail]

Gluten-free diets have taken the diet spotlight as of late, but how much do you really know about them? Before jumping onto the gluten-free bandwagon, be sure to carefully consider all available information. After all, there’s still a lot that the experts themselves are unsure of. [Healthland TIME]

Forget Wheaties™. Believe it or not, the new breakfast of champions may in fact include a modest portion of cake, cookies, or ice cream. [NY Times]

Are the current formulas used to predict weight loss setting people up for disappointment? Forgetting to take into account that metabolic rate can change during weight loss could make the difference between missing and meeting target goals. [Guardian UK]

When it comes to regulating the types of foods available to school-aged children, just how strict is too strict. Not surprisingly, the answer depends on who you’re asking. [NY Times]

The saga continues: when it comes to weight gain, is it the quality or quantity of calories that matters? [Science Daily]

 

Healthy Nibbles: 13 February 2012 Edition

21 Feb

From our eyes to yours … here’s what’s up in health and nutrition news for the week of February 13th, 2012:

The US First Lady, Michelle Obama, getting involved in her "Let's Move" anti-obesity campaign.

Welcome back post-Family Day! Hope everyone was able to get up, get out, and enjoy some extra time with loved ones. Fresh off the heels of this holiday weekend, here are some pics of one of the most prominent North American family figureheads, Michelle Obama, modeling various states of UNrest as part of her “Let’s Move” anti-obesity initiative. [The Guardian UK]

Supersizing hasn’t done much to help consumers cut back on already oversized restaurant portions. Instead, how about just asking them if they’d like less? [Healthland TIME]

Immigrating to the United States? The culture shock may include more than just having to learn a second language or navigate novel customs. Planting new roots may also involve increasing the risk of obesity in subseqent generations. [Science Daily]

Contrary to popular belief, trouble isn’t the only thing that teens get into when left to their own devices. When given the right tools and support, they may just surprise parents by developing an improved body image and healthy eating habits. [Healthland TIME]

You know it’s time to reconsider your snack choice when your snack itself is cutting calories. [Reuters]

That being said, when it comes to snacking on chocolate, if you consider a high content of cacao, add a few other healthy ingredients, and minimize as much superfluous sugar as possible, and you may just rediscover the FUN in this proposed functional food. [Healthland TIME]

Healthy Nibbles: Mike Evans Edition

30 Jan

 

The first month of 2012 is nearly finished. Hopefully you’ve had some time to wind down from the holidays and are now in full gear for the year ahead. Like you, I have set my goals for 2012 and am feeling refreshed and rejuvenated to start working towards accomplishing them. A constant item on my new year’s resolution list: “get healthy.”

To maintain momentum while getting healthy, it always helps to remember the big picture benefits behind eating mindfully and exercising regularly. To do this, check out Dr. Mike Evans’ visual lecture on, what according to him, is “The Single Best Thing You Can Do for Your Health.”

Even if the information he provides isn’t new to you, hopefully his unique way of presenting it will help make the take home message all the more salient. Enjoy!

Cheers to The Atlantic for the video.

Healthy Nibbles: Mark Bittman Edition

28 Nov

Heavens, where has the time gone?! It’s been EONS (well, several weeks) since the last edition of Healthy Nibbles and to be quite honest, it will likely still be a few more until the next. What can I say, life happens – my apologies (for the gap in entries of course, not for life happening). Regardless, with the holidays just around the corner, I thought it only appropriate to get into the spirit of the season and actually SHARE something.

That being said, since I’ve been unable to hunker down and share my own two cents about recent health and nutrition news, I thought it would be just as charitable to share the ideas of others.

This week, I’ve selected Mark Bittman’s 2007 TED Talks discussion on what’s wrong with our current way of eating. If you haven’t already read his book, ‘Food Matters,’ I’d suggest picking up a copy, if for no other reason than to get your hands on a few easy recipes. Who doesn’t enjoy learning a few extra tricks in the kitchen? But if you have the time to actually read the book, it’s worth the extra effort. For me, ‘Food Matters’ was my first exemplar of truly ‘functional’ knowledge transfer.  That is, its ideas are not only communicated in an easy-to-understand way, but also given practical application within a day-to-day context. After all, we can talk until we’re blue in the face about the scientific evidence supporting the health benefits of different types of foods, but it means absolutely nothing if people don’t even know what to do with these foods once they get them in the kitchen.