Tag Archives: High Cholesterol

Healthy Nibbles: 10 October 2011 Edition

17 Oct

From our eyes to yours … here’s what’s up in health and nutrition news for the week of October 10th, 2011:

Groupon, the online group shopping incentive (think group + coupon), has heads turning in Indianapolis for its recent deal-of-the-day on … wait for it … breast milk. That’s right, human B.R.E.A.S.T milk. While the purported health benefits of breast milk are numerous, not all new moms may be able to produce and supply sufficient amounts of it. This particular groupon therefore aims to make accessing it from other sources (i.e. donors) more affordable, essentially bridging yet another gap in nutrition accessibility. Is it weird that since hearing about this groupon all I can think about is Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath? [Healthland TIME]

Thanks to the collaborative effort of researchers from Australia and the United States, another piece of the obesity puzzle has been put into place. Not only does this research highlight the discovery of a novel protein influencing leptin sensitivity (or more specifically, leptin IN-sensitivity), but also that the timing of leptin modulation can impact obesity progression. Just another reminder that there is far more to solving the obesity problem than a simple balancing of calories in and calories out. [Science Daily]

Speaking of modulating sensitivity, researchers from Duke University have found that sensitivity to simvastatin (Zocor®), a conventional pharmaceutical therapy for high cholesterol, may be influenced by the type of microbes present in the gut. Not only does this finding suggest a novel means by which to pre-screen for simvastatin responsiveness (i.e. by identifying what kinds of microbes are present), but also a relatively simple way to improve treatment efficacy (i.e. by consuming simvastatin-friendly probiotics). [Healthland TIME]

Too much of a good thing, any good thing, is rarely a good idea. In fact, according to recent research examining the risk of death in older women and prostate cancer prevention in men, too much of certain supplements may actually do more harm than good. Though a necessary means to compensate for an existing nutrient deficiency, researchers caution against the unnecessary OVER-use of supplements. Instead, they suggest adopting a healthy diet as a safer alternative to achieving optimum nutrient balance. Adding further credence to the benefits of whole foods …

… are the results from a new study out of Oregon State University which suggest that the bioactive constituents of broccoli may be best consumed in vegetable form, rather than as an isolated supplement, in order to maximize their beneficial anti-cancer health effects. Just how many more times does it need to be said? Eat. Your. Vegetables. Even just a little bit, everyday. [Science Daily]