Tag Archives: Knowledge Translation

Healthy Nibbles: 03 October 2011 Edition

10 Oct

From our eyes to yours … here’s what’s up in health and nutrition news for the week of October 3rd, 2011:

It’s Thanksgiving! Here’s hoping that at some point over this long weekend you’ve found time to reflect and revel in all that you have to be thankful for. When you’re done doing that though and are ready to indulge in some tasty thanksgiving treats, here are a few tips to help keep you from crossing that fine line into OVERindulgence. Although an older post, it’s nonetheless still a relevant one – for future thanksgivings to come, and indeed for any non-holiday day as well. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! 🙂 [Kombat Arts Blog]

New hope has emerged for type II diabetics. Animal research out of the Washington University School of Medicine suggests that administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a naturally occurring upstream molecule on the pathway to NAD production, improves glucose tolerance to almost normal levels (!!!) Okay, so maybe it’s not so much a ‘new’ hope after all – more like ‘newly re-discovered.’ Either way, these pre-clinical results offer some early hope for the amelioration of one of Canada’s fastest growing diseases. [Science Daily]

Ordering a salad from a fast-food joint may be equally as counterintuitive as getting a diet coke with your combo. For most patrons, it just doesn’t make sense. Not surprisingly therefore, recent food survey results demonstrate that less than half of the American consumers who say they want healthy fast-food menu options, actually order them. According to popular food journalist Mark Bittman, the REAL problem may not be what we order in fast-food lines, but rather that we even join the line in the first place. Rather than pointing the finger at fast-food moguls for their contribution to the current obesity epidemic, perhaps it’s time we consider turning at least one of those fingers inwards, towards ourselves. [Healthland TIME]

Speaking of self-initiative, though much has changed since the 1970’s (i.e. the popularity of bell-bottoms, lava lamps, and disco music), other things such as self-empowerment have endured. It’s been 40 years since the inception of Our bodies, Ourselves, a comprehensive, candid, and easy-to-read road map of women’s sexuality and reproductive health, and yet its popularity continues to grow. Surely an ongoing testament to the significance of self-empowerment, it also sounds remarkably like an uber successful grassroots knowledge translation (KT) initiative, non? [Washington Post]